New article on the experiences of women working in the field of ASDP

oct 2017 skate, development, afghanistan
New article on the experiences of women working in the field of ASDP

New article on the experiences of women working in the field of ASDP

A new article on the experiences of women working in ASDP organisations and management implications.

A new article by Associate Professor Holly Thorpe and Dr Megan Chawansky published in the Journal of Sport Management titled 'The gendered experiences of women staff and volunteers in sport for development organizations: The case of transmigrant workers of Skateistan'. The purpose of this research was to understand both the unique challenges faced by the female transmigrant workers who are employed by SfD organizations and identify formal and informal management strategies that may aid in the recruitment and retention of staff working in complex and challenging international contexts.

In this paper the authors present six key findings related to the process of international female staff work-related migration and the various managerial strategies employed to facilitate such transitions and safer, more effective, and culturally sensitive work experiences. These themes are (a) the initial motivations of the female staff, (b) organizational selection mechanisms, (c) organizational culture (with a particular focus on the management of risk), (d) work–life balance, (e) how female staff “ manage the self” in a complex work context, and (f) negotiations of self within postcolonial critiques of development work.

Perhaps of particular interest to ASDP organizations based in high-risk locations, section c) is titled 'management of risk' and the "glorification of grit". In this section, the participants talked about the importance of inspirational yet accessible leadership, the mentoring of incoming staff, and their relationships with one another and local staff as key components for the development of an organizational culture that creates space for individuals to learn from one another and to share their fears, anxieties, and struggles. Some interviewees also spoke about the ‘glorification of grit’ that they feel is common among many international organizations working in conflict/post-conflict settings.  Ultimately, this section revealed that individuals make meaning of risk differently, yet all navigate their own personal fears within a particular organizational culture.

If you're interested in reading the full article and do not have access to the journal, please email us for a copy (admin@actionsportsfordev.org).